Religious Harmony: 51 Great Things About Bahrain

#10 Religious Harmony

Bahrain is a land of many cultures and faiths. The Kingdom’s relations with countries around the world make it a welcoming destination for individuals from different walks of life.

Al Fateh Grand Mosque

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The Al-Fateh Grand Mosque is the largest place of worship in Bahrain, with the capacity to accommodate over 7,000 worshippers. It was built in 1987 by the late Shaikh Isa bin Salman and named after Ahmed Al-Fateh (Ahmed the Conqueror), Bahrain’s first hakim or monarch. The dome built atop the mosque is currently the largest fibreglass dome in the world, weighing over 60 tons. Its Islamic library holds around 7,000 books – including copies of the teachings of the Prophet Muhammad (books of Hadith), which have been printed over 100 years ago.

Our Lady of Arabia Cathedral

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Known as the largest Roman Catholic church in the Gulf Region, the Our Lady of Arabia Cathedral – named after the patroness of the vicariate of Northern Arabia – can seat at least 2,300 people. It features several tiers of seating, two chapels, and an 800-capacity auditorium. It is intended to serve as a reference point for the Apostolic Vicariate of Northern Arabia. It is said to resemble a tent in which Moses met his people as described in the Old Testament, and is topped with an octagonal dome under which most of the congregation will sit for mass.

Sri Krishna Temple

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Dedicated to Lord Shrinatji – a form of the deity, Krishna manifested as a seven-year-old child – the Shrinathji Temple or Sri Krishna Temple is a heritage Hindu temple in Manama. It is among the oldest temples in the region, constructed by the Thattai Hindu community, who had migrated from Sindh before the partition of India in 1817. In 2019, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi visited the temple and launched a renovation plan worth $4.2 million.


This article is part of an ongoing series – 51 Great Things About Bahrain as a tribute to the Kingdom’s 51st National Day. Read more in this special edition.

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