Health & Well-Being

0805 Fitness’ EMS Training Review

Nick Cooksey tried 0805 Fitness’ EMS Training and this is what happened.

Electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) is the elicitation of muscle contraction using electric impulses which can be used as a training tool. Already trending in places like Dubai, London and New York, EMS training is now available in Bahrain at 0805 Fitness.

I took four sessions on the same day each week in a nice and spacious compound in Budaiya. EMS training can be used for several fitness goals; in my case, functional strength. The first time was slightly unnerving – I was put into one of the training suits and straps were added around my glutes, legs and arms which looked like I was going to be electrocuted. The suit was hooked into the EMS machine that stimulates muscle contraction due to electric impulses.

On another note, the training suits cost BD30, which seems expensive as the material used is cotton (those who do not want to buy their own can rent the suits). The sessions also seem pricey at BD15 for 20-minutes.

I went through reps of basic exercises that wouldn’t normally cause me to break a sweat but the EMS experience felt more intense than it looked. It’s also worth noting that EMS’s instructor, Shannai, was very good. Shannai was a former top level professional rugby player in South Africa who has moved to Bahrain to train people using EMS.

0805 Fitness claims that one EMS session is equivalent to going to the gym thrice, for 45 minutes. Upon research, I could not find any scientifically-backed evidence of this claim. Is it worth it? You can try and decide if you like it yourself.

In medicine, EMS is used for rehabilitation purposes, for instance in physical therapy in the prevention muscle atrophy due to inactivity or neuromuscular imbalance, which can occur for example after musculoskeletal injuries (damage to bones, joints, muscles, ligaments and tendons).

The Verdict

Pros:

  • The training supervisor was very professional.
  • The gym was spacious and clean.

Cons:

  • Expensive.
  • There’s no benchmarking of progress, especially to those who are only training for functional strength.

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